Signs and symptoms of breast cancer

Health December 17, 2015

Widespread use of screening mammograms has increased the number of breast cancers found before they cause any symptoms. Still, some breast cancers are not found by mammogram, either because the test was not done or because, even under ideal conditions, mammograms do not find every breast cancer.

The most common symptom of breast cancer is a new lump or mass. A painless, hard mass that has irregular edges is more likely to be cancerous, but breast cancers can be tender, soft, or rounded. They can even be painful. For this reason, it is important to have any new breast mass or lump or breast change checked by a health care professional experienced in diagnosing breast diseases.

Other possible symptoms of breast cancer include:

  • Swelling of all or part of a breast (even if no distinct lump is felt)
  • Skin irritation or dimpling
  • Breast or nipple pain
  • Nipple retraction (turning inward)
  • Redness, scaliness, or thickening of the nipple or breast skin
  • Nipple discharge (other than breast milk)

Sometimes a breast cancer can spread to lymph nodes under the arm or around the collar bone and cause a lump or swelling there, even before the original tumor in the breast tissue is large enough to be felt. Swollen lymph nodes should also be reported to your doctor.

Although any of these symptoms can be caused by things other than breast cancer, if you have them, they should be reported to your doctor so that he or she can find the cause.

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Signs and symptoms of diabetes

Health December 17, 2015

Main_symptoms_of_diabetesIndividuals can experience different signs and symptoms of diabetes, and sometimes there may be no signs. Some of the signs commonly experienced include:

  • Frequent urination
  • Excessive thirst
  • Increased hunger
  • Weight loss
  • Tiredness
  • Lack of interest and concentration
  • A tingling sensation or numbness in the hands or feet
  • Blurred vision
  • Frequent infections
  • Slow-healing wounds
  • Vomiting and stomach pain (often mistaken as the flu)

The development of type 1 diabetes is usually sudden and dramatic while the symptoms can often be mild or absent in people with type 2 diabetes, making this type of diabetes hard to detect

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Health December 17, 2015

images_258A common symptom of CHD is angina. Angina is chest pain or discomfort that occurs when your heart muscle doesn’t get enough oxygen-rich blood.

In men, angina often feels like pressure or squeezing in the chest. This feeling may extend to the arms. Women can also have these angina symptoms. But women also tend to describe a sharp, burning chest pain. Women are more likely to have pain in the neck, jaw, throat, abdomen, or back.

In men, angina tends to worsen with physical activity and go away with rest. Women are more likely than men to have angina while they’re resting or sleeping.

In women who have coronary micro-vascular disease, angina often occurs during routine daily activities, such as shopping or cooking, rather than while exercising. Mental stress also is more likely to trigger angina pain in women than in men.

The severity of angina varies. The pain may get worse or occur more often as the buildup of plaque continues to narrow the coronary (heart) arteries.

Signs and Symptoms Coronary Heart Disease Complications
Heart Attack

The most common heart attack symptom in men and women is chest pain or discomfort. However, only half of women who have heart attacks have chest pain.

Women are more likely than men to report back or neck pain, indigestion, heartburn, nausea (feeling sick to the stomach), vomiting, extreme fatigue (tiredness), or problems breathing.

Heart attacks also can cause upper body discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, or upper part of the stomach. Other heart attack symptoms are light-headedness and dizziness, which occur more often in women than men.

Men are more likely than women to break out in a cold sweat and to report pain in the left arm during a heart attack.

Heart Failure

Heart failure is a condition in which your heart can’t pump enough blood to meet your body’s needs. Heart failure doesn’t mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop working. It means that your heart can’t cope with the demands of everyday activities.

Heart failure causes shortness of breath and fatigue that tends to increase with physical exertion. Heart failure also can cause swelling in the feet, ankles, legs, abdomen, and veins in the neck.

Arrhythmia

An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm.

Some people describe arrhythmias as fluttering or thumping feelings or skipped beats in their chests. These feelings are called palpitations.

Some arrhythmias can cause your heart to suddenly stop beating. This condition is called sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). SCA causes loss of consciousness and death if it’s not treated right away.

Signs and Symptoms of Broken Heart Syndrome

The most common signs and symptoms of broken heart syndrome are chest pain and shortness of breath. In this disorder, these symptoms tend to occur suddenly in people who have no history of heart disease.

Arrhythmias or cardiogenic shock also may occur. Cardiogenic shock is a condition in which a suddenly weakened heart isn’t able to pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs.

Some of the signs and symptoms of broken heart syndrome differ from those of heart attack. For example, in people who have broken heart syndrome:

  • Symptoms occur suddenly after having extreme emotional or physical stress.
  • EKG (electrocardiogram) results don’t look the same as the EKG results for a person having a heart attack. (An EKG is a test that records the heart’s electrical activity.)
  • Blood tests show no signs or mild signs of heart damage.
  • Tests show no signs of blockages in the coronary arteries.
  • Tests show ballooning and unusual movement of the lower left heart chamber (left ventricle).
  • Recovery time is quick, usually within days or weeks (compared with the recovery time of a month or more for a heart attack).

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Symptoms of HIV/AIDS

Health December 17, 2015

symptoms-of-aidsWHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF HIV?

The symptoms of HIV vary, depending on the individual and what stage of the disease you are in.

EARLY STAGE OF HIV: SYMPTOMS

Within 2-4 weeks after HIV infection, many, but not all, people experience flu-like symptoms, often described as the “worst flu ever.” This is called “acute retroviral syndrome” (ARS) or “primary HIV infection,” and it’s the body’s natural response to the HIV infection.

Symptoms can include:

  • Fever (this is the most common symptom)
  • Swollen glands
  • Sore throat
  • Rash
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle and joint aches and pains
  • Headache

These symptoms can last anywhere from a few days to several weeks. However, you should not assume you have HIV if you have any of these symptoms. Each of these symptoms can be caused by other illnesses. Conversely, not everyone who is infected with HIV develops ARS. Many people who are infected with HIV do not have any symptoms at all for 10 years or more.

 

You cannot rely on symptoms to know whether you have HIV. The only way to know for sure if you are infected with HIV is to get tested. If you think you have recently been exposed to HIV—if you have had oral, vaginal or anal sex without a condom with a known HIV positive person or a partner whose HIV status you do not know or shared needles to inject drugs—get an HIV test. Traditional HIV tests detect HIV antibodies. But during this early stage your body is not yet producing these antibodies. A new HIV test was approved in 2013 that can detect the presence of HIV in your body during this early stage of infection. So no matter where you get tested, it is very important to let your provider know that you may have been recently infected with HIV and you would like to be tested for acute HIV. Use the HIV/AIDS Testing and Services Locator to find a HIV testing site near you or enter your location here:

THE CLINICAL LATENCY STAGE

After the early stage of HIV infection, the disease moves into a stage called the “clinical latency” stage. “Latency” means a period where a virus is living or developing in a person without producing symptoms. During the clinical latency stage, people who are infected with HIV experience no HIV-related symptoms, or only mild ones. (This stage is sometimes called “asymptomatic HIV infection” or “chronic HIV infection.”)

During the clinical latency stage, the HIV virus reproduces at very low levels, although it is still active. If you takeantiretroviral therapy (ART), you may live with clinical latency for several decades because treatment helps keep the virus in check. (Read more about HIV treatment.) For people who are not on ART, this clinical latency stage lasts an average of 10 years, but some people may progress through this phase faster.

It is important to remember that people in this symptom-free period are still able to transmit HIV to others even if they are on ART, although ART greatly reduces the risk of transmission.

Again, the only way to know for sure if you are infected with HIV is to get tested. Tests are available that can detect the virus at this stage. Use the HIV/AIDS Testing and Services Locator to find a HIV testing site near you.

PROGRESSION TO AIDS: SYMPTOMS

If you have HIV and you are not taking HIV medication (antiretroviral therapy), eventually the HIV virus will weaken your body’s immune system. The onset of symptoms signals the transition from the clinical latency stage to AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome).

During this late stage of HIV infection, people infected with HIV may have the following symptoms:

  • Rapid weight loss
  • Recurring fever or profuse night sweats
  • Extreme and unexplained tiredness
  • Prolonged swelling of the lymph glands in the armpits, groin, or neck
  • Diarrhea that lasts for more than a week
  • Sores of the mouth, anus, or genitals
  • Pneumonia
  • Red, brown, pink, or purplish blotches on or under the skin or inside the mouth, nose, or eyelids
  • Memory loss, depression, and other neurologic disorders.

Each of these symptoms can be related to other illnesses. So, as noted above, the only way to know for sure if you are infected with HIV is to get tested.

Many of the severe symptoms and illnesses of HIV disease come from the opportunistic infections that occur because your body’s immune system has been damaged. (Read more about opportunistic illnesses.)

For more information, see the National Library of Medicine’s AIDS.

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Signs and Symptoms of Tuberculosis

Health December 17, 2015

Pulmonary_tuberculosis_symptoms-1Although your body may harbor the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, your immune system usually can prevent you from becoming sick. For this reason, doctors make a distinction between:

  • Latent TB. In this condition, you have a TB infection, but the bacteria remain in your body in an inactive state and cause no symptoms. Latent TB, also called inactive TB or TB infection, isn’t contagious. It can turn into active TB, so treatment is important for the person with latent TB and to help control the spread of TB in general. An estimated 2 billion people have latent TB.
  • Active TB. This condition makes you sick and can spread to others. It can occur in the first few weeks after infection with the TB bacteria, or it might occur years later.

Signs and symptoms of active TB include:

  • Coughing that lasts three or more weeks
  • Coughing up blood
  • Chest pain, or pain with breathing or coughing
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Night sweats
  • Chills
  • Loss of appetite

Tuberculosis can also affect other parts of your body, including your kidneys, spine or brain. When TB occurs outside your lungs, signs and symptoms vary according to the organs involved. For example, tuberculosis of the spine may give you back pain, and tuberculosis in your kidneys might cause blood in your urine.

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Signs and Symptoms of Lung Cancer

Health December 17, 2015

symptomsMost lung cancers do not cause any symptoms until they have spread too far to be cured, but symptoms do occur in some people with early lung cancer. If you go to your doctor when you first notice symptoms, your cancer might be diagnosed at an earlier stage, when treatment is more likely to be effective. The most common symptoms of lung cancer are:

  • A cough that does not go away or gets worse
  • Chest pain that is often worse with deep breathing, coughing, or laughing
  • Hoarseness
  • Weight loss and loss of appetite
  • Coughing up blood or rust-colored sputum (spit or phlegm)
  • Shortness of breath
  • Feeling tired or weak
  • Infections such as bronchitis and pneumonia that don’t go away or keep coming back
  • New onset of wheezing

If lung cancer spreads to distant organs, it may cause:

  • Bone pain (like pain in the back or hips)
  • Nervous system changes (such as headache, weakness or numbness of an arm or leg, dizziness, balance problems, or seizures), from cancer spread to the brain or spinal cord
  • Yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice), from cancer spread to the liver
  • Lumps near the surface of the body, due to cancer spreading to the skin or to lymph nodes (collections of immune system cells), such as those in the neck or above the collarbone

Most of the symptoms listed above are more likely to be caused by conditions other than lung cancer.

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“19 dead babies” United States-based Jamaica-trained expert heartbroken over deaths of 19 babies

Health November 1, 2015

Rudolph Brown
From left: Marion Bullock DuCasse, director of emergency, disaster management and special services in the health ministry; Dr Kevin Harvey, permanent secretary in the Ministry of Health; and Health Minister Dr Fenton Ferguson about to brief the media on the outbreak of klebsiella and serratia on October 20.

A Jamaica-trained, United States-based neonatologist has described the deaths of the 19 babies in two local hospitals as heartbreaking, while arguing that “it is quite possible that without the bacteria, the doctors at the hospitals would have worked magic to keep the infants alive”.

Winslade Bowen, who is based in Florida, told The Sunday Gleaner that the deaths of the babies, whose underdeveloped and fragile bodies were devastated by klebsiella and serratia bacteria at two of the country’s top hospitals, was an unspeakable, painful tragedy.

“My heart is full and broken over this whole matter. As a Jamaica-trained doctor, I weep over this. Here am I in another country offering my services, and my country is bleeding from this painful tragedy,” said Bowen, who, as a neonatologist, would have had at least four years of medical school, three years of residency training in general paediatrics, and three years of additional training in newborn intensive care.

He argued that if he were based in Jamaica, it is very possible that he would have been directly involved with the day-to-day care of the babies.

“It is very painful for me, right now,” said Bowen. “The death of a child is a heart-rending event by any measure and under any circumstance. The families and loved ones of these dear children deserve all the support and love that can be offered.

“Needless to say, trite responses are callous and may, in fact, betray a lack of regard for human life. I sincerely hope that none of these responses came from any of my fellow alumni of the Faculty of Medical Sciences at UWI (University of the West Indies),” added Bowen, as he expressed a desire to return home.

Bowen, who was born at the Victoria Jubilee Hospital, attended Jamaica College before his medical training at the UWI. He said he was in medical school with Dr Allison Nicholson, senior microbiologist at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI).

“I have worked in a level-three facility for most of my life. Level one is like a regular nursery. Level two mildly to moderately ill babies who do not require ventilatory support for more than 24 hours and would not be premature less than 32 weeks.

“Level three are babies born less than 30 weeks, weighing less than 1,000 grams (2.2 pounds), requiring protracted ventilatory support and other forms of life support, 24-hour monitoring, seven days each week, and extremely premature infants, who could be as premature as 23 weeks, or six months pregnant.

“The bread and butter of what we do is actually to take care of these infants,” declared Bowen.

He noted that at level three, the prematurity of the babies could present with widespread issues.

According to Bowen, a level-four facility would include babies presenting with all of the previously mentioned symptoms, plus the need for paediatric cardiac surgery or extreme life support, where an external system oxygenates their blood for re-absorption.

Bowen told The Sunday Gleaner that he suspects the UHWI may only have the capabilities for level-three babies, even though some would present with level-four needs.

He said three years ago, he was involved in the donation of some equipment to the neonatal unit at the UHWI and learnt of the “extreme challenges facing the medical professionals there”.

“It is tough when you do not have the resources to provide the things that are needed to this unique segment of the paediatric population, who have immature respiratory and immune systems, who are susceptible to infections, and who have to be handled consistently.

“They have a lot of interface with individuals and machines,” he explained.

Bowen noted that because of the consistent support that these babies need, “cleanliness is critical to every breath taken by these children”.

“If there is one thing you must choose if resources are scarce, it’s handwashing. Here, soap and handwashing facility is everywhere. When you are handling children this delicate, if you have to wash your hands 100 times per day, wash it. Klebsiella can be transmitted that way (dirty hands). You must trim you nails and wash your hands. I cannot overemphasise that,” said Bowen.

Shortages of basic items, including cleaning agents in the hospitals, have been raised publicly and privately by medical officials.

Months ago, former Jamaica Medical Doctors Association President Dr Alfred Dawes said cleaning agents were just one of myriad things not available in the hospitals.

At that time, Dawes warned of the dangers to patients as medical personnel had to become experts at improvisation. Dawes has since left the public sector.

Bowen said it was possible that klebsiella was imported to the hospital, even as he questioned if any of the infants presented a condition known as necrotising enterocolitis – a breakdown of the gut tissue that could have caused klebsiella to invade and produce the infection.

He said the babies could also have been infected through the ventilation system.

“Serratia is renowned for living in equipment. If the babies are on ventilators and the system is infected, they are going to be infected,” he stated.

According to Bowen, several years ago, there was a serratia outbreak involving babies in the hospital he works, and it was determined that it was spread though the vacuum-cleaning of the contaminated carpet in the nursery.

He urged local health officials to “cultivate cleanliness, excellence and safety”, and suggested “a regular review of morbidity and mortality among this group as trends may indicate the need for pre-emptive action”.

So far, two officers of the UHWI – CEO Dr Cecil White and Medical Chief of Staff Professor Trevor McCartney – have resigned in the wake of the deaths of the babies at that hospital and the St James-based Cornwall Regional Hospital.

Questions have also been raised about the time taken by senior officials in the health ministry to respond after the first death linked to klebsiella and serratia was reported.

source: Link

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Renewed call for health minister to resign

Health, News post October 22, 2015

(L) FERGUSON… says he only became aware of the deaths last Friday. (R) SIMPSON MILLER… accused of protecting the health minister.

THERE is a renewed call for the sacking of Health Minister Dr Fenton Ferguson over the outbreak of healthcare- associated infections at the University Hospital of the West Indies and Cornwall Regional Hospital which have claimed the lives of 18 babies since June.

The Ministry of Health disclosed at a press conference on Tuesday that a total of 42 babies had contracted the infections, which have since been identified as the klebsiella and serratia strains. The outbreaks happened in the neonatal intensive care units at the hospitals.

A defensive Ferguson maintained Tuesday that he only learnt of the deaths on Friday, the same day news surfaced about the shocking incident.

In a press release yesterday, Opposition Leader Andrew Holness expressed condolence to the grieving families, and called on Prime Minister Portia Simpsom Miller to sack Ferguson.

“… The prime minister is protecting the failing health minister, is just as culpable for his failures, and should act like a prime minister and remove him,” Holness said while campaigning in Nine Miles, Clarendon South Eastern, yesterday.

“When 18 babies die of a mysterious illness and the minister of health is comfortable in saying that he has only just learnt of it… when the nation doesn’t even trust what the minister says since his Chik-V cover-up, and when we see the deterioration of our health services to a point which we have never seen before in the history of Jamaica, how can the prime minister not act?” he asked.

“I am very distressed that this could happen in Jamaica. The prime minister is answerable to the parents of these children as much as the Minister is answerable, because the truth is the prime minister has protected the incompetence of this Minister for too long. On behalf of the Jamaica Labour Party, we express our sincere condolences to the families affected by this latest debacle,” he added.

Holness, who served briefly as prime minister in 2011, labelled Simpson Miller as “irresponsible” for “having such a minister remain in the Cabinet”.

“…While outbreaks can happen, proper management of the health system could have reduced their spread and impact. This man should not hold his job and in any self-respecting democracy, would not hold his job as minister of health. We call upon the prime minister to act like a prime minister and protect the health of the people; remove that minister and place someone there who has greater competence in managing your health care. Enough is Enough,” Holness said.

The call for Dr Ferguson to resign comes a year after he faced similar pressure over the handling of the chikungunya virus outbreak which crippled the economy and has been blamed for several deaths.

 

 

Published By: The Observer

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Outbreak Of Hand, Foot And Mouth Disease In Several Schools

Health, News post September 28, 2015

 A parent of a student of the Bridgeport Infant School points to rash which have developed on the foot of the child.
The Ministry of Education is reporting that there is now an outbreak of the hand, foot and mouth disease in several schools. The schools include the Bridgeport Infant and the Reliance Basic schools in Portmore, St Catherine which have been ordered closed. The Ministry of Health says it has provided guidelines for the management of this virus in educational institutions.

About hand, foot and mouth disease
• Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a common childhood illness caused by a coxsackie virus.
• The illness most often occurs in the months occurring in spring and fall and is most frequently seen in young children, infants, and toddlers.
• It is characterised by fever and a blister-like rash affecting the palms of the hands and soles of the feet along with blisters inside the mouth.

Causes
• Children usually become infected with the virus from other children in an oral-faecal pattern; that is, from exposure to oral secretions (nasal discharge, saliva, etc.) or to stool.
• It typically occurs in small epidemics in nursery schools or kindergartens, usually during the summer and autumn months.

Symptoms and Signs

• Hand, foot, and mouth disease usually occurs in the spring and fall seasons but may occur at any time during the year.
• The initial symptoms include fever and general malaise (poor appetite, aches and pains, e.tc).
• These symptoms generally last one to two days before a blister-like rash develop on the hands, feet, and in the mouth.
• The rash initially appears as small red spots but then develops into vesicles (blisters).
• The blisters may develop on the gums, inner cheeks, and tongue and patients may complain of mouth pain and a sore throat.
• These young patients tend to drool and avoid swallowing and may refuse to drink or eat because of the discomfort.
• Very young infants may even become dehydrated due to the refusal to drink.

When to Seek Medical Care
• Any high fever in a very young infant should be evaluated by a health-care practitioner.
• For older infants and children, as long as the child has adequate oral intake, this particular illness can be managed comfortably at home.

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Treatment
• There is no specific treatment for Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease.
• Supportive care, including fever management, and prevention of dehydration are the primary goals.
• Please note that prolonged elevated temperatures in children, signs or symptoms of dehydration (dry skin and mucous membranes, weight loss, persistent irritability, lethargy, or decreased urine output), are indications that immediate medical attention should be sought.

Methods of control
• Appropriate infection control practices are recommended to prevent the spread of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease.
• Preventive measures include limiting person to person contact and promote hand washing and other hygienic measures.
• Children infected with the virus causing Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease generally have mild illness and recover within one week of developing symptoms.
Infection Control Practices
• Suspected cases should be immediately separated from the general school population and sent home on identification.
• Frequent disinfection of schools is especially important in order to prevent the spread of this disease.

Disinfection
• Schools should regularly clean all areas and items that are more likely to have frequent hand contact (for example, taps, toys, keyboards, door handles or desks) and also clean these areas immediately when visibly handled by ill persons.
• Common commercial disinfection agents should be used and the package directions adhered to.
• The Ministry of Health recommends 5% bleach (which is commonly sold commercially) diluted 1 part bleach to 10 parts water.
School officials should contact their Parish Health Department for additional guidance.
Schools should ensure that custodial staff and others (such as classroom teachers) who use cleaners or disinfectants understand their safe and appropriate use.

Reporting
• The Parish Health Department should be notified if there is any increase in the number of cases of Hand, Foot and Mouth disease at the institution (day care, schools, etc.).
• These cases should be line listed as identified.

Published By: The Gleaner

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SERHA implementing measures to improve infection control

Health, News post September 24, 2015

 

KINGSTON, Jamaica – The South East Regional Health Authority says it has installed 307 hand washing stations as part of measures being implemented to improve infection control in all its secondary care facilities.

Under the project, 411 foot operated hand washing stations will be installed in all the hospitals that fall under SERHA’s responsibility. These include the Kingston Public and Victoria Jubilee Hospitals (KPH/VJH), Bustamante Hospital for Children, Hope Institute, Sir John Golding Rehabilitation Centre, National Chest, Princess Margaret, Spanish Town and Linstead Hospitals.

“The new hand washing stations will replace the traditional hand operated ones. Over 100 of the 307 stations are already installed at KPH/VJH,” Dr Andrei Cooke, SERHA Board Chairman explained.

“Proper hand washing is the most effective way to prevent the spread of infections in hospitals and so the installation of these types of hand washing stations is in keeping with best practice in the prevention of infection in our hospitals. This will foster an environment that is safe for patients, staff and visitors,” he added.

The hand washing stations are being installed in the high risk service delivery areas such as maternity/obstetrics, operating theatre, neonatal unit, intensive care unit and accident and emergency department. The project is valued at J$15 million, and is being funded by the National Health Fund.

It began in September 2014 and is slated to be completed by the end of September 2015.

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Signs and symptoms of breast cancer

Health September 15, 2015

Widespread use of screening mammograms has increased the number of breast cancers found before they cause any symptoms. Still, some breast cancers are not found by mammogram, either because the test was not done or because, even under ideal conditions, mammograms do not find every breast cancer.

The most common symptom of breast cancer is a new lump or mass. A painless, hard mass that has irregular edges is more likely to be cancerous, but breast cancers can be tender, soft, or rounded. They can even be painful. For this reason, it is important to have any new breast mass or lump or breast change checked by a health care professional experienced in diagnosing breast diseases.

Other possible symptoms of breast cancer include:

  • Swelling of all or part of a breast (even if no distinct lump is felt)
  • Skin irritation or dimpling
  • Breast or nipple pain
  • Nipple retraction (turning inward)
  • Redness, scaliness, or thickening of the nipple or breast skin
  • Nipple discharge (other than breast milk)

Sometimes a breast cancer can spread to lymph nodes under the arm or around the collar bone and cause a lump or swelling there, even before the original tumor in the breast tissue is large enough to be felt. Swollen lymph nodes should also be reported to your doctor.

Although any of these symptoms can be caused by things other than breast cancer, if you have them, they should be reported to your doctor so that he or she can find the cause.

 

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Pharmacy inventory tracking systems now being implemented by government

Health, News post September 4, 2015

Published:Friday | September 4, 2015

Health minister Dr Fenton Ferguson says the Ministry of Health will be spending a total of $8 billion to procure pharmaceuticals, sundries and reagents for the public health sector.

The health minister, Dr Fenton Ferguson says his ministry has started the implementation of a pharmacy management information system which should help to better track pharmaceutical inventory.

He says the new system will help to address shortage of pharmaceuticals at some public health facilities by the availability of items, their expiration date as well as order levels.

Ferguson says this will provide a national picture and allow for the movement of drugs from one facility to another as required.

He points out that the Ministry of Health will be spending a total of $8 billion to procure pharmaceuticals, sundries and reagents for the public health sector.

Just last week contracts were signed with 47 suppliers to increase the supply of pharmaceuticals and sundries by $3.8 billion to the public health sector.

published by The Gleaner.

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